LONG SWAMP RESTORATION TRIAL, DISCOVERY BAY COASTAL PARK

As you might have guessed from its name, Long Swamp is a long, narrow wetland system that is situated literally in the far south-western corner of Victoria, near the township of Nelson.

Long Swamp extends for over 15km, from the Glenelg River estuary, south-eastwards to Lake Mombeong and is bounded by coastal dunes to the south and higher undulating ground to the north. This wetland is one of the key environmental features conserved within Discovery Bay Coastal Park, is listed on the Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia, and forms part of one of the Australian Government’s identified High Ecological Value Aquatic Ecosystem (HEVAE) sites across the country.

Like many wetlands across southern Australia, the hydrology of Long Swamp has been altered (through a range of factors) since European settlement, and there has been growing concern within the local community about the current trends of change within the wetland system.

After the launch of Nature Glenelg Trust in January 2012, we began working in partnership with the local community and the agencies responsible for the management of Long Swamp, to:

  • help better understand the current values of the system,
  • document the historic and current trajectory of change, and
  • articulate future management options that are based around a sound set of principles that are guided by the scientific work undertaken.

The findings of the baseline Long Swamp Fish and Frog Study, commissioned by the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and undertaken by Nature Glenelg Trust in 2012, can be downloaded here: Long Swamp Fish and Frog Survey 2012.

As a result of the this work and other previous studies, Nature Glenelg Trust has been awarded grant funding by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI), to undertake a hydrological restoration trial at the Nobles Rocks outlet from Long Swamp, through the installation of temporary sandbag weir structures in 2014/15.

This project has been made possible by the generous support of the Nelson Coastcare Group, Parks Victoria, DEPI, the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and a wide range of other people in the local cross-border community.

Please check the blogs below for the latest updates on the project, as well as a large amount of additional background information.

  • Let’s start a conversation about the future of Herne Swamp and the Wallan Wallan Wetlands March 13, 2019 Last year, after giving a talk to a group of guests at Walker Swamp (who attended the Biolinks Alliance symposium in June), I was invited to inspect Herne Swamp, an artificially drained wetland situated at Wallan (north of Melbourne, near the headwaters of Merri Creek). We were asked to have a look around, because there are ...
  • Farewell to Andy, our longstanding caretaker of Eaglehawk Waterhole March 13, 2019 For over three years Andy Lines has been our amazing on-site caretaker at Eaglehawk Waterhole. He has systematically pulled and sprayed Salvation Jane over the entire property, fumigated extensive areas of rabbit warrens, mapped wetland boundaries with GPS, pulled down old fences, collected insects, recorded new species to the property (including Fiery Jewel Butterflies and ...
  • Critically endangered bat species confirmed at Mt Burr Swamp March 13, 2019 If you’ve been following NGT for a while you will remember that back in 2016 we ran a campaign to secure funding for the organisation’s second restoration reserve, Mt Burr Swamp. Our supporters got behind our vision for the property, and helped us raise the funds necessary for the purchase of 300 hectares immediately adjacent ...
  • Preparing the ground at Walker Swamp – the end of the beginning March 13, 2019 Twelve months into the Walker Swamp project and we are nearly ready to install the regulator on the outlet of the northern Bunnugal Drain and restore the wetland permanently. Works to prepare the ground at Walker Swamp have been gathering pace and a suite of projects are all now underway or about to start prior to ...
  • Kurrawonga: A charm of magpies, the bathing wallaby, and perhaps a wombat? March 13, 2019 Our most recent working bee at Kurrawonga took place on a thankfully cool day in February. With several chainsaw-skilled volunteers we were able to have four saws going at once and made huge progress on the remaining Coast Wattle. Hopefully, we will be able to remove the final remnants at our next working bee! We also set up ...
  • Even more new species found at Mt Burr Swamp March 13, 2019 As Nature Glenelg Trust and our fantastic volunteers continue the restoration journey at our Mt Burr Swamp property we are continually adding to our list of species for the reserve. As Rose recounts here, we can now confirm the presence of critically endangered Southern Bent-winged Bats on the property, an exciting discovery and something that ...
  • Latest news from Hutt Bay, Long Swamp, Walker Swamp and Mt Burr Swamp March 13, 2019 Back in February, I had a great chat with Selina Green from ABC South East. In a wide-ranging chat that took us all around the region, we talked about current NGT projects at Hutt Bay, Long Swamp, Walker Swamp and Mt Burr Swamp, and plans for the months ahead. If you’d like to hear all about it, then ...
  • Introducing Jodie, our in-house art therapist March 13, 2019 Would you like to look at conservation from another perspective? Try the arts! My name is Jodie, and I’m at NGT as part of my practicum as an art therapist. Art offers different ways of creating connections, looking at situations, choosing from alternatives, and other things we do when we work with complex natural and human ...
  • Exciting volunteer opportunities coming up at NGT – take a look! March 13, 2019 It’s been a busy month getting the volunteer management system up and running! One of the things I’ve been working on is identifying what activities volunteers can get involved in and when they’ll be happening throughout the year. I’ve put together a volunteer activity calendar for 2019, which you can see below. This calendar is packed with ...
  • One step closer to re-establishing a keystone species, Murray Crayfish, in South Australia March 13, 2019 Did you know that the second largest freshwater crayfish in the world, the Murray Crayfish (Euastacus armatus), was once widespread and abundant in the Murray River in South Australia? However, following population loss attributed to habitat degradation such as the regulation of flows and water abstraction, and other impacts (including a historical commercial fishery in ...

Click here for the full list of blogs related to the restoration trial

Click here for the full list of other archived blogs related to Long Swamp

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