LONG SWAMP RESTORATION TRIAL, DISCOVERY BAY COASTAL PARK

As you might have guessed from its name, Long Swamp is a long, narrow wetland system that is situated literally in the far south-western corner of Victoria, near the township of Nelson.

Long Swamp extends for over 15km, from the Glenelg River estuary, south-eastwards to Lake Mombeong and is bounded by coastal dunes to the south and higher undulating ground to the north. This wetland is one of the key environmental features conserved within Discovery Bay Coastal Park, is listed on the Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia, and forms part of one of the Australian Government’s identified High Ecological Value Aquatic Ecosystem (HEVAE) sites across the country.

Like many wetlands across southern Australia, the hydrology of Long Swamp has been altered (through a range of factors) since European settlement, and there has been growing concern within the local community about the current trends of change within the wetland system.

After the launch of Nature Glenelg Trust in January 2012, we began working in partnership with the local community and the agencies responsible for the management of Long Swamp, to:

  • help better understand the current values of the system,
  • document the historic and current trajectory of change, and
  • articulate future management options that are based around a sound set of principles that are guided by the scientific work undertaken.

The findings of the baseline Long Swamp Fish and Frog Study, commissioned by the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and undertaken by Nature Glenelg Trust in 2012, can be downloaded here: Long Swamp Fish and Frog Survey 2012.

As a result of the this work and other previous studies, Nature Glenelg Trust has been awarded grant funding by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI), to undertake a hydrological restoration trial at the Nobles Rocks outlet from Long Swamp, through the installation of temporary sandbag weir structures in 2014/15.

This project has been made possible by the generous support of the Nelson Coastcare Group, Parks Victoria, DEPI, the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and a wide range of other people in the local cross-border community.

Please check the blogs below for the latest updates on the project, as well as a large amount of additional background information.

  • Sharing Boandik culture at Mount Burr Swamp Restoration Reserve March 19, 2020 Nature Glenelg Trust is proud to announce a cultural learning area at Mt Burr Swamp Restoration Reserve. A site overlooking the wetland is progressively being created to facilitate story-telling and learning about cultural heritage on Boandik country. The descendants of Annie Brice, a Boandik woman featured in an inspiring children’s book titled ‘Annie’s Story’, travelled ...
  • Fantastic news for the NGT Foundation – establishment of the Moore Family Fund March 19, 2020 In some tremendous news for the NGT Foundation, we are delighted to announce that a new named fund has been established thanks to the ongoing support of the family of Bill and Kate Moore. The Moore family are the previous owners and donors of NGT’s Kurrawonga Conservation Reserve in Nelson, Victoria. With the establishment of the Moore ...
  • The frogtastic Southern Bell Frog facility March 19, 2020 Things are coming along in NGT’s nationally threatened Southern Bell Frog (aka Growling Grass Frog – Litoria raniformis) conservation facility at Clayton Bay! We now have 35 frogs being carefully maintained by a band of committed volunteers supported by Rupert and Sylvia from NGT. Getting individuals in as tadpoles (late last year) as opposed to adults ...
  • Mainland Forgotten Fauna Part 12: Tasmanian research provides new clues on what went wrong on the mainland… and what we could do next March 19, 2020 It has been a little while since the last Mainland Forgotten Fauna instalment – Part 11 – where we looked back at the time when the stony rises of western Victoria were teeming with quolls. This was also an era when western Victoria was the hub of the mainland’s population of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, an originally ...
  • The mysterious case of the disappearing sandbag structures… March 19, 2020 Glenshera Swamp, the largest and most intact example of the critically endangered Fleurieu Peninsula Swamps ecological community, has been the focus of NGT hydrological restoration for over three years now. In April 2017 we back-filled several old drains that had been cut through the peat bed in the 1950s. Drain back-filling was done by machine ...
  • Clean Up Australia Day at Hutt Bay! March 19, 2020 NGT staff and volunteers kicked off the beginning of Autumn at Hutt Bay Wetland Reserve for our first Clean Up Australia Day event! We had a fantastic turnout of 21 people, who worked up and down the beach removing rubbish and lots of Coastal Cape Weed (Arctotheca populifolia), also known as Cape Beach Daisy. This ...
  • Catching up with long-term NGT volunteer – Andy Lines March 19, 2020 Before moving back to Adelaide, Andrew Lines worked and volunteered for NGT primarily at our Eaglehawk Waterhole Restoration Reserve from 2016-2019 where he undertook a range of activities including the preparation of an insect collection. Andy found several rare species at Eaglehawk Waterhole and the collection is a testament to his dedication to insect conservation ...
  • Photo of the month – The unity of cushion plants, Mount Field National Park March 19, 2020 This photo of the month was taken near Newdegate Pass in Mount Field National Park, which we were lucky to visit while on a recent hiking trip to Tasmania. Cushion plants occur in alpine areas across the world. Rather than one large plant, they’re a community of tiny shoots tightly packed together to form a mat. ...
  • TAFE SA students go bush with Nature Glenelg Trust March 19, 2020 Last month, Mount Gambier TAFE SA students headed out into the bush with NGT to undertake seed collecting as part of their Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management studies. Students visited a number of local environments to learn about the diversity of plant species, seed types and the timing and principles of seed collection, and gained ...
  • Let’s talk about ‘Project Coorong’ and the key role of complementary coastal wetland restoration in maintaining Ramsar values February 20, 2020 On Thursday, myself and Mark from NGT headed to Meningie for a very informative and detailed workshop, where the community was given the opportunity to hear from SA Government (DEW) staff and researchers leading the scientific investigations that form part of ‘Project Coorong’; as well as ask questions, discuss what we learned and then provide ...

Click here for the full list of blogs related to the restoration trial

Click here for the full list of other archived blogs related to Long Swamp

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