LONG SWAMP RESTORATION TRIAL, DISCOVERY BAY COASTAL PARK

As you might have guessed from its name, Long Swamp is a long, narrow wetland system that is situated literally in the far south-western corner of Victoria, near the township of Nelson.

Long Swamp extends for over 15km, from the Glenelg River estuary, south-eastwards to Lake Mombeong and is bounded by coastal dunes to the south and higher undulating ground to the north. This wetland is one of the key environmental features conserved within Discovery Bay Coastal Park, is listed on the Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia, and forms part of one of the Australian Government’s identified High Ecological Value Aquatic Ecosystem (HEVAE) sites across the country.

Like many wetlands across southern Australia, the hydrology of Long Swamp has been altered (through a range of factors) since European settlement, and there has been growing concern within the local community about the current trends of change within the wetland system.

After the launch of Nature Glenelg Trust in January 2012, we began working in partnership with the local community and the agencies responsible for the management of Long Swamp, to:

  • help better understand the current values of the system,
  • document the historic and current trajectory of change, and
  • articulate future management options that are based around a sound set of principles that are guided by the scientific work undertaken.

The findings of the baseline Long Swamp Fish and Frog Study, commissioned by the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and undertaken by Nature Glenelg Trust in 2012, can be downloaded here: Long Swamp Fish and Frog Survey 2012.

As a result of the this work and other previous studies, Nature Glenelg Trust has been awarded grant funding by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI), to undertake a hydrological restoration trial at the Nobles Rocks outlet from Long Swamp, through the installation of temporary sandbag weir structures in 2014/15.

This project has been made possible by the generous support of the Nelson Coastcare Group, Parks Victoria, DEPI, the Glenelg Hopkins CMA and a wide range of other people in the local cross-border community.

Please check the blogs below for the latest updates on the project, as well as a large amount of additional background information.

  • Walker Swamp fundraiser – almost there! July 26, 2019 NGT supporters are awesome! Some have donated a few dollars, some much more, and all those dollars are adding up. Thank you! The live tally is … We’ve had lots of lovely messages about reasons for donating and what supporters value about the work NGT does. Some supporters have visited our sites, some live far away, but ...
  • We want you! (To help us plant 13,000 seedlings) July 26, 2019 Planting season is here, and we have two large community planting events coming up. We would love to see lots of you come along! First up is our annual planting and camping event at Eaglehawk Waterhole on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of August 2019. This year we will be planting 7,000 seedlings over three days ...
  • Time to check in with our busy and dedicated winter volunteers July 26, 2019 It’s been a busy month in the world of Nature Glenelg Trust’s volunteers! We’ve made a start on our planting for the year and have also been busy in the nursery, getting ready for propagating new seedlings for our planting projects. We’ve recently had a group of new volunteers join some wonderful long-term volunteers on our volunteer ...
  • Would you like to be NGT’s next Volunteer Coordinator? July 26, 2019 As we have just farewelled Kimberley Height, who did a fantastic job of developing NGT’s volunteer program over the past several months, we are currently seeking a new Volunteer Coordinator. This is a volunteer position and an excellent work experience, internship or volunteering opportunity for anyone interested in the fields of conservation, environmental management, communications or ...
  • Tiny seeds for Orange-bellied Parrots July 26, 2019 NGT spent a few sunny days in the salt-marshes of south west Victoria collecting Beaded Glasswort (Sarcocornia quinqueflora) seeds. These tiny seeds will hopefully provide some valuable information towards the ongoing research supporting the Orange-bellied Parrots in their fight against extinction. Many hours were spent collecting and cleaning the tiny seeds in preparation to freeze them, ...
  • Look who’s been hanging around our Long Swamp restoration site! – Another record of an Australasian Bittern July 26, 2019 This curious and nationally endangered Australasian Bittern (Botaurus poiciloptilus) was snapped on our wildlife camera during NGT’s Long Swamp restoration works near Nobles Rocks. The works are funded by a Biodiversity Response Planning grant from the Victorian Government, and were detailed here earlier in the year. In our most recent works, we pumped sand to the ...
  • NGT bushcare crew tackles a sandhill challenge July 26, 2019 NGT staff have been busy with a range of bushcare projects this autumn and winter. In one of these, the Glenelg Hopkins CMA called us in to work with Parks Victoria on woody weed removal at a remote spot in the Discovery Bay dune system. The site is an elevated limestone ridge, partially covered by shallow ...
  • Winter update on the Mulloway Tagging Program July 26, 2019 Since our last post about the Mulloway Tagging Program in March 2019, we have recorded a number of new interesting recaptures. There are currently 75 anglers across Victoria dedicating their time to tagging Mulloway. Collectively, they have tagged almost 500 Mulloway, and so far we have recorded a total of 64 recaptures, which equates to around ...
  • Downstream benefits of peat wetland restoration on the Fleurieu Peninsula July 26, 2019 As regular readers will know, Glenshera Swamp (including Stipiturus Conservation Park) is one of the largest and most intact examples of the critically endangered Fleurieu Pensinsula Swamps, and a site that NGT have been helping to restore in South Australia. Back in July 2016, several months before we had undertaken any restoration works, we installed a ...
  • Kurrawonga’s two-tailed lizard and other exciting discoveries! July 26, 2019 Introducing Kurrawonga’s two-tailed resident! As a self-defence strategy to distract predators, most lizards can drop their tails when hit or stressed. The dropped tail will continue wriggling to catch the predator’s attention and allow for the lizard’s speedy escape. This self-amputation mechanism is also known as autotomy. This White’s Skink (Liopholis whitii) was possibly able to drop ...

Click here for the full list of blogs related to the restoration trial

Click here for the full list of other archived blogs related to Long Swamp

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