RESTORATION TRIAL AT GOOSENECK SWAMP, GRAMPIANS NATIONAL PARK

Gooseneck Swamp is situated at the far south-eastern corner of the Grampians National Park in Victoria’s South West. Gooseneck Swamp and Brady Swamp are wetlands of the Wannon River Floodplain, as the river reaches the flats after exiting the valley between the Serra and Mt William Ranges within the Grampians.

Having been made the terminus for discharging flows from the Bunnugal Rural Drainage Area from around 1900 (bringing water from the drained Heifer Swamp), both Gooseneck and Brady Swamp were themselves subsequently drained in in the 1950s.

Although Gooseneck Swamp naturally discharges into Brady Swamp, it must fill to a certain height before the natural discharge channel and wider connecting floodplain receive flows. As a result, the artificial cutting in the lunette bank that separates Gooseneck Swamp from Brady Swamp, was enabling the swamp to freely drain to its bed level once inflows ceased. The images below show the location of the lunette bank that separates the two swamps, the original flowpath and the artificial cutting.

Interest in the restoration of Gooseneck Swamp began in the mid 1980s, when the property was acquired by the Victorian Government and eventually incorporated into the Grampians National Park. In 2013, after many years of work, modelling studies and biological investigations by a range of organisations, Nature Glenelg Trust began working towards a staged process of restoration at the site in partnership with the Glenelg Hopkins CMA, Parks Victoria and local landholders – starting with a proposal to construct a low cost and low risk trial sandbag weir structure in the Gooseneck Swamp artificial outlet drain.

Thanks to the support of the Department of Environment and Primary Industries – Communities for Nature Grants, the restoration trial structure was completed and in place in August 2013.

For more information on the step-by-step progress of the trial, please browse the project blogs, via the links below.

  • Growlers Bouncing Back at Brady Swamp December 6, 2016 Being out on Brady Swamp in a kayak, looking up at the Grampians and listening to the awe-inspiring sound of growling grass frogs (also called southern bell frogs) was one of those moments of self-reflection. A time to stop and truly appreciate how lucky you are to be doing what you’re doing. To refresh your memory, ...
  • Grampians Platypus sighting gains lots of interest September 23, 2016 After the recent post about a Platypus sighting, we received some fantastic feedback from our newsletter subscribers. Ryan Duffy from Parks Victoria said the sighting caused a bit of excitement in their Grampians office, because the only official records and recent sightings from within the National Park are on the MacKenzie River, in a separate catchment in the northern portion ...
  • Rare sighting of a platypus caught on video between Gooseneck and Walker Swamp September 20, 2016 I was just starting to stroll into the Grampians National Park, along the drain that flows from Walker Swamp towards Gooseneck Swamp off Lynchs Crossing Road, when something caught my eye in the drain…      Is that a water rat?      No, that’s a bill – it is a platypus! That was the moment I ...
  • Update on southern Grampians restored wetlands – the flows have arrived! August 30, 2016 Last week I took the opportunity to check back in on some of the restoration sites we have been working on around the southern Grampians, and I have some good news! Let’s start the journey a bit further east, and up the Bunnugal drain, to one of the first sites we worked on under the Wetland ...
  • Permanent pools along the Wannon River provide critical refuge through the tough times June 28, 2016 Back in April, Liam and I spent a week exploring the southern Grampians in search of permanent pools along the Wannon River to identity key drought refuge sites (permanent pools) for native aquatic species. These surveys were part of a wider project (generously funded by the Victorian State Government) aimed at acquiring baseline information on the population ...
  • Gooseneck Swamp update – the long wait for Wannon River flows continues… June 11, 2016 Just in case you were wondering how dry it was in 2015, last year was the first time that some long-term locals we’ve spoken to recall not seeing Wannon River flows reach Gooseneck and Brady Swamps, at the south-eastern corner of the Grampians National Park. Given that permanent restoration works were completed in time for winter last year – ...
  • The changing face of Gooseneck Swamp – entering the big dry October 29, 2015 Despite being ready to celebrate the permanent restoration of Gooseneck and Brady Swamps after the completion of earthworks in autumn this year, nature has deciced to make us wait a little longer… You see, as a result of a very dry winter and spring so far, the Wannon River hasn’t flowed this year in the vicinity ...
  • Upcoming Brady Swamp Planting Day – THIS SUNDAY – the 12th of July July 9, 2015 Join us for an afternoon planting session at the Brady Swamp complex, near Dunkeld this Sunday, 12 July. The day will be a great opportunity to check out the progress on the wetland restoration at this site, whether you are familiar with the site or interested to learn more about the area. We’ll be aiming ...
  • 200+ hikers flow though Gooseneck & Brady Swamps as part of Grampians Serra Terror trek June 11, 2015 Over the June long weekend, a couple of us NGT’ers took the challenge of tackling the Grampians Serra Terror trek which raises funds for the Dunkeld community. 80km of walking through peaks and flats of the Southern Grampians across two days made for amazing views, access to some great country and team bonding over blister ...
  • Sharing exciting Gooseneck Swamp news with the Hamilton Field Naturalists Club March 27, 2015 Last week I has the pleasure of catching up with our friends from the Hamilton Field Naturalists Club, a group of great people that NGT has developed a strong working relationship with over the past few years. Before my talk, it was a particular privilege to witness the group’s President John Cayley being presented with ...

Click here for the full list of project related blogs

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