WETLAND RESTORATION ON PRIVATE LAND CASE STUDY 3: BEAUFORT DISTRICT

In this, the third of our early works case studies, we review another completed Nature Glenelg Trust wetland restoration project on a property near Beaufort in Central Victoria.

This project was developed to aid the restoration of a five hectare swamp that occurs on a natural watercourse flowing into Fiery Creek.  The site provides important water storage in the local drainage network whilst also supporting a high quality remnant red-gum forest that creates important habitat for local bird populations.

Earthworks undertaken by previous owners that included channel excavation and the construction of levee embankments have caused significant modification to the natural wetland area.  Since purchasing the property the new owners had noticed changes occurring to the natural inundation zone of the swamp which had historically backed up into the standing red-gums. Concerned that the wetland area was impacted by these past works, the landholders were keen to engage with us to help find a possible solution and develop a remedial response to this issue. After preliminary assessments were undertaken we were able to identify that the recently excavated channels constructed by the previous owners had created a new subsurface drainage pathway for the surface water. The channel excavations had been cut through a shallow depth impervious clay layer in the natural soil structure, subsequently providing an exit route for the surface water to drain through a deeper deposited gravel bed, artificially hastening the loss of water from the wetland system.

On ground works were designed to reduce the depth of the excavated drainage channel by relining the channel bed to effectively reinstate the original confining clay layer. Suitable clay material was sourced on site and a local earthworks contractor was engaged to fill and re-line the drainage channels. To ensure that the capping material was suitably impervious, bentonite clay fines were integrated into the material to increase the sealing effectiveness of the bed material.

This Case Study is the third in a series to illustrate wetland restoration in practice, delivered through Nature Glenelg Trust’s Wetland Restoration Program on Private Land and funded by the Australian Government.

  • The NGT blogs are back – and there is a lot to catch up on! June 23, 2017 To say we’ve been a little busy at NGT over the past couple of months would be a serious understatement, with a plethora of project reports to finalise before the end of financial year – and unfortunately this has kept us a bit quieter than usual on the blogs. So to keep you up to date with ...
  • New habitats recorded for the western swamp crayfish in the Southern Grampians June 23, 2017 Back in May, Lachie and I headed out for some field work to conduct some snap shot fish surveys in two recently restored wetlands near Dunkeld – Green Swamp and Brady Swamp. Brady swamp is part of a wider wetland complex along the Wannon River, while Green Swamp is a more isolated wetland, nearby to the ...
  • Eaglehawk Waterhole Update – planting, weeding and fauna surveys coming up! June 23, 2017 Saturday July 29th will be our final planting day this season for 6500 seedlings to go into the 70ha+ revegetation site we’ve been tackling over the last 3 years. We recorded a very handsome 90% survival rate from last year’s plantings and with Sam and Andy busy fumigating warrens, removing tree guards on seedlings that are ...
  • Revegetation season begins again June 23, 2017 With the arrival of winter, revegetation plantings have begun around the region with seedlings from NGT’s nursery being used in multiple projects. 2017 is the final year of our 20 Million Trees reveg project at Eaglehawk Waterhole, during which we will have planted over 15000 seedlings starting in 2015. This federal Landcare project aims to have ...
  • Southern Brown Bandicoots are now on the radar June 23, 2017 Well it was this time last year (in 2016) that we reported on how the third ‘once in a decade’ digging abundance survey for the Southern Brown Bandicoot was back underway. Through the Restoring Under-represented Ecological Communities project, NGT ended up completing the survey in 2016 (thanks to a massive stint of field work by our then ...
  • Orange-bellied Parrot mainland-release and winter surveys June 23, 2017 In mid-April 2017, 11 Orange-bellied Parrots were released in a restricted area near the Western Treatment Plant in Werribee. This first mainland release is part of a four-year trial Program which is seeking to release small flocks of OBPs into suitable habitat. All released birds have a radio transmitter attached to two tail feathers and are ...
  • Long Swamp fish monitoring update June 23, 2017 Many community members would remember the feeling of satisfaction after helping build a trial stricture (made of 7000 sand bags) to regulate the final artificial outlet from Long Swamp at Nobles Rocks. This weir successfully resulted in the recovery of approximately 200 hectares of aquatic habitat upstream of the outlet and with the help of significant ...
  • Freshwater fish monitoring near Adelaide captured by Channel Ten’s “Scope TV” June 23, 2017 Our monitoring of freshwater fish in autumn was covered by Channel Ten’s “Scope TV” show, as they were interested in finding out how environmental flows and fish ladders are helping native species return to the River Torrens. In conjunction with our autumn Western Mt Lofty Ranges fish monitoring, we’re pleased to spread the word about the importance ...
  • Creating a highway of a different kind: connecting our patches of remnant woodland June 23, 2017 Students from Millicent High School and Newbery Park Primary School have started to transform the Honan to Woolwash wildlife corridor into what might one day become a ‘bandicoot highway’! The ForestrySA Biodiversity Corridor School Program’s aim this year is to increase the density of understorey cover in several corridors. The improvement of species diversity and habitat structural ...
  • Bringing the concept of “Connections in Nature” to life in our schools June 23, 2017 As part of ForestrySA’s schools program I recently visited Glenburnie Primary School to talk to the Years 4-7 students about Connections in Nature. We began the session by brainstorming our favourite outdoor places and then our favourite animals. The students enthusiastically participated in the discussion about how different animals were connected to one another (via food-webs) ...

Click here for the full list of project related blogs

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.