WETLAND RESTORATION ON PRIVATE LAND CASE STUDY 4: CASHMORE DISTRICT

This is the fourth of our early works case studies, where we review a trial sandbag structure installed at Cashmore.

This project involved the installation of a temporary sandbag weir in an artificial drain on a private property near Portland, in far south-western Victoria. The temporary weir was constructed using sandbags made from geo-textile material placed to form a weir wall and overflow sill within the existing drainage channel. The trial sandbag structure is designed to function as a drainage regulation weir, where water flowing out of the drainage channel is retained to promote pooling of the backwater into the natural wetland depression located directly upstream. In this instance, the landholder was interested in restoring the natural wetland area – noting that this area had become much drier since the construction of the drain – as the wetland area itself was considered to be of marginal value for agricultural purposes.

The temporary sandbag weir was installed in early June, prior to the above average July rains in that district, being completed by the landholder, members from a local landcare group and Nature Glenelg Trust.  The weir structure has been designed to recreate a 4 hectare wetland area by restricting drainage outflows by up to 60 cm within the existing drainage channel.  NGT’s Lachlan Farrington put together a short summary of the action, which can be viewed below:

Temporary trial weir structures provide both Nature Glenelg Trust and the landholders we work with, with an inexpensive and low risk approach to trialing wetland restoration measures. Once the functionality of the structure and its wetland restoration impact have been assessed by both parties – under real conditions – a permanent structure can be designed and installed according to a set of agreed criteria. In this way, trial structures can provide a valuable (no-obligation) first step, along the path to providing lasting, self-sustaining and effective wetland restoration solutions in the region.

Trial structures are not necessary at every site, but are a good option for people who are tentative about making the leap to a permanent structure, without having the opportunity to see what the potential inundation effect will be first under a range of settings and conditions. If you are interested in having a wetland restoration trial undertaken on your property, please contact us here.

This Case Study is the fourth in a series to illustrate wetland restoration in practice, delivered through Nature Glenelg Trust’s Wetland Restoration Program on Private Land and funded by the Australian Government.

  • Announcing… Walker Swamp Restoration Reserve – NGT’s First Wetland Reserve in Victoria May 10, 2018 In what is proving to be a very big year for Nature Glenelg Trust, we have some further tremendous news to share! I am really excited to be able to announce that NGT has recently purchased Walker Swamp, our first wetland reserve in Victoria – situated in the southern Grampians near Dunkeld. Following up from the recent news ...
  • Our fantastic neighbours and volunteers help us ‘get off the ground’ at Walker Swamp May 10, 2018 Now that the news about Walker Swamp is out in the public arena, I thought I’d share a really great little story about how a series of acts of generosity over the past couple of months have helped us made a start in setting the site up for its future use as a permanent conservation area. Such gestures ...
  • James Darling AM and Lesley Forwood commit to the NGT Foundation May 10, 2018 The feedback so far on the establishment of the NGT Foundation has been extremely positive, as people clearly understand our desire to ensure that NGT’s impact is lasting. James Darling AM and Lesley Forwood care deeply about our region and have been tremendous supporters of NGT, in a variety of ways, ever since our journey began almost six and half years ...
  • Orange-bellied Parrots are on their way back for the winter May 10, 2018 Orange-bellied Parrots have started their journey back to the mainland and the first wild-bred male parrot has already been sighted near the Werribee treatment plant. The OBP recovery team has again released captive birds at two different sites on mainland Victoria and we have to expect different behaviour with the new releases (click here to find updates on ...
  • Planting season is nearly here – and yes, you can join us! May 10, 2018 It’s nearly that time of year again – planting season is upon us! Along with other staff and volunteers our nursery officer, Ryan, has been working hard all year to produce seedlings for this years’ revegetation efforts. Over the next couple of months we will be planting at a number of sites in our focal region, and ...
  • In case you missed it… NGT Foundation stories in print and on radio May 10, 2018 The launch of the NGT Foundation last month was picked up in the local media – which was a nice early boost to this important new initiative! First up, here is my ABC South East interview with Selina Green, explaining what the Foundation is all about: Finally, here is a really great short article that appeared in the Border ...
  • Millicent High students learn about their local Indigenous history May 10, 2018 As part of ForestrySA’s biodiversity corridors schools program, a group of Millicent High students and I were joined by Elder Doug Nicholls for a cultural outing this week. We visited two significant cultural sites: native wells and a rock shelter, both in the Mt Burr area. Doug spoke about the particular characteristics and importance of each ...
  • Revisiting the RRR Conference – Part 2 – Breaking long-term deadlocks to restore wetlands on public and private land May 10, 2018 Next up in this series (note: you can see Part 1 here) of short 2-page papers I wrote-up after presenting at the Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate  (RRR) Conference in Armidale last year, is a story describing how NGT worked with a wide range of people to progress two proposed restoration projects that stalled for many years (for different reasons) and as ...
  • Changing the future trajectory of the Southern Bent-winged Bat May 10, 2018 Last month the National Threatened Species Recovery Hub released lists of the top 20 Australian birds and mammals they consider most likely to go extinct in the next 20 years. According to the research, there is a high chance that ten bird and seven mammal species will disappear in this time – unless we do something different ...
  • Launching the NGT Foundation – a new initiative and major milestone for NGT! April 20, 2018 After six years of delivering results on the ground, we're demonstrating to our partners, supporters and the wider community that NGT is planning for the future. Inspired by a similar model successfully adopted by the Tasmanian Land Conservancy, who have generously shared their experiences with us, the NGT Foundation...

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