WETLAND RESTORATION ON PRIVATE LAND CASE STUDY 4: CASHMORE DISTRICT

This is the fourth of our early works case studies, where we review a trial sandbag structure installed at Cashmore.

This project involved the installation of a temporary sandbag weir in an artificial drain on a private property near Portland, in far south-western Victoria. The temporary weir was constructed using sandbags made from geo-textile material placed to form a weir wall and overflow sill within the existing drainage channel. The trial sandbag structure is designed to function as a drainage regulation weir, where water flowing out of the drainage channel is retained to promote pooling of the backwater into the natural wetland depression located directly upstream. In this instance, the landholder was interested in restoring the natural wetland area – noting that this area had become much drier since the construction of the drain – as the wetland area itself was considered to be of marginal value for agricultural purposes.

The temporary sandbag weir was installed in early June, prior to the above average July rains in that district, being completed by the landholder, members from a local landcare group and Nature Glenelg Trust.  The weir structure has been designed to recreate a 4 hectare wetland area by restricting drainage outflows by up to 60 cm within the existing drainage channel.  NGT’s Lachlan Farrington put together a short summary of the action, which can be viewed below:

Temporary trial weir structures provide both Nature Glenelg Trust and the landholders we work with, with an inexpensive and low risk approach to trialing wetland restoration measures. Once the functionality of the structure and its wetland restoration impact have been assessed by both parties – under real conditions – a permanent structure can be designed and installed according to a set of agreed criteria. In this way, trial structures can provide a valuable (no-obligation) first step, along the path to providing lasting, self-sustaining and effective wetland restoration solutions in the region.

Trial structures are not necessary at every site, but are a good option for people who are tentative about making the leap to a permanent structure, without having the opportunity to see what the potential inundation effect will be first under a range of settings and conditions. If you are interested in having a wetland restoration trial undertaken on your property, please contact us here.

This Case Study is the fourth in a series to illustrate wetland restoration in practice, delivered through Nature Glenelg Trust’s Wetland Restoration Program on Private Land and funded by the Australian Government.

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  • Sharing the restoration plans for Square Waterhole Swamp (Hesperilla CP) September 8, 2017 Well, it’s been quite a journey over the past 12 months in getting to know another important wetland on the Fleurieu Peninsula at Hesperilla CP (just south of Mt Compass), a small remnant portion of the originally much larger Square Waterhole Swamp. After digging through the history, talking to the locals, reviewing the maps and bashing through ...
  • Tookayerta catchment report: sharing a complex story of landscape change September 8, 2017 In conjunction with the recent work completed for Hesperilla Conservation Park, Natural Resources SA MDB also asked NGT to provide a broader view and understanding of landscape change in the wider Tookayerta Catchment (around Mt Compass) on the Fleurieu Peninsula south of Adelaide – with a view to this work helping us understand where and if opportunities ...
  • Murray Crayfish Part 1: Tracking recovery of populations impacted by blackwater disturbance September 8, 2017 Over the past four years, we have continued monitoring populations in the Murray River that had suffered significant (80% decline) population loss due to the 2010‒11 extreme blackwater event. Over that time, we have only observed a gradual increase in the abundance of affected populations, and the species has not been detected at almost one-third ...
  • Murray Crayfish Part 2: First (official) reintroductions in almost a century! September 8, 2017 Fish stocking for fishery purposes is routinely undertaken, but conservation translocations remain relatively uncommon in the aquatic world (in terrestrial ecosystems however they are more widespread). On a sunny day in late July 2017, a small but important step toward the recovery of Murray crayfish was undertaken involving the release of 200 Murray crayfish into ...
  • Murray Crayfish Part 3: Status assessment of Victorian recreational fishery September 8, 2017 With the impacts (and fishing closures) occurring in New South Wales, Victoria now maintains the geographically largest recreational fishery for the species. With this in mind, it is timely that we have just finalised the most comprehensive assessment of the Victorian recreational fishery in Victoria ever undertaken. The assessment relied on population benchmarking, assessment of long-term trends ...
  • Murray Crayfish Part 4: They’re not in SA, but they could be… the search continues in the Lower Murray September 8, 2017 After four years of searching, which included over 7700 net hours (number of nets per site times by the number of hours each net was set for – that’s also 321 net days), at almost 30 sites we have failed to detect a single Murray crayfish in the South Australian section of the Murray River (e.g. ...
  • Budding young scientists explore the underwater world at Mt Burr Swamp! September 8, 2017 Lauren and Michelle recently hosted two fantastic aquatic workshops at Mt Burr Swamp for students from Newbery Park Primary School and Millicent High School. The clinics are part of the ForestrySA Schools Program which focusses on biodiversity education, including corridors. This workshop was aimed at teaching students about the importance of aquatic invertebrates and what ...
  • Managing water on the flats at Eaglehawk Waterhole – a different kind of wetland restoration September 8, 2017 Thanks to the wet spring last year, we finally saw NGT’s Eaglehawk Waterhole (our restoration reserve in the Upper South East), back to looking at its best – with large areas of shallow seasonal wetland inundating the SA blue gum and buloke woodland flats for the first time since 2013. However, we also noticed that in a ...
  • NGT welcomes new staff to the team – Ben Taylor and Michelle Sargent September 8, 2017 It’s been another busy time over recent months, and NGT are fortunate to have been joined by another couple of fantastic recruits to our team: Ben Taylor, as a Senior Wetland Ecologist based out of Adelaide, and Michelle Sargent, a recent graduate who has recently commenced a part-time intership based out of the regional NGT ...

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