23 Apr 2017 Summing up the final round of Tookayerta Catchment consultation

Thanks to everyone who came along just before Easter to our final round of workshops with the community in Mount Compass (on Wednesday evening 12/4) and technical experts in Mount Barker (Thursday 13/4) for the Tookayerta Catchment (wetland restoration feasibility) Assessment project.

Despite a much smaller audience at the community discussion than the December session, we had some excellent, in-depth conversations that will be extremely beneficial for helping us to finalise our assessment of potential future wetland restoration options across the catchment. The technical workshop on the Thursday also provided an excellent opportunity to discuss project progress in depth with 15 NRM experts who kindly came along to share their ideas, experience and suggestions. Our final report to Natural Resources SA MDB will now be prepared with the benefit of this collective input and expertise.

The audience at the Tookayerta Catchment Assessment technical workshop at Mt Barker on the 13th of April 2017 - at this point, talking about the logistics of wetland restoration.

Attendees at the Tookayerta Catchment Assessment technical workshop at Mt Barker on the 13th of April 2017 – at this point, talking about the wetland restoration feasibiity considerations. Photo by Nicola Barnes, Natural Resources SA MDB.

But to reassure you that all this research and the associated conversations are ultimately intended to lead to real action on the ground, it is perhaps worth reiterating that the Tookayerta Catchment Assessment is about identifying some of the Fleurieu Swamp systems in the catchment with the best restoration potential.

With that ultimate outcome in mind, the types of steps involved in site-specific restoration planning were also shared at both sessions – using the Square Waterhole Swamp within Hesperilla Conservation Park as a case study. Situated within the same catchment, this important reserved wetland area has been impacted by past artificial drainage and we’re currently working on designing specific solutions for how water management at the site could be improved to benefit the wetland in the future. Subject to funding, it could then lead to similar works as those currently underway at nearby Glenshera Swamp, in Stipiturus Conservation Park.

Square Waterhole Swamp in Hesperilla Conservation Park - just south of Mount Compass on the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Retaining important values despite the impact of artificial drainage: Square Waterhole Swamp in Hesperilla Conservation Park – just south of Mount Compass on the Fleurieu Peninsula.

This project is supported by:

Logo_Natural-Resources_SA-Murray-Darling-Basin

Mark Bachmann
Mark Bachmann
mark.bachmann@natureglenelg.org.au