The link between drains, wetland restoration and native freshwater fish conservation

In last week’s radio interview on ABC South East, after a general Mt Burr Swamp update, NGT’s Nick Whiterod joined in the progressive conversation (see previous posts here and here) to talk about native freshwater fish in the South East. This gave us an opportunity to explain how a wet year has benefits that extend far beyond ecological values, and how fish and frogs are useful indicators of the health of our water resources.

You can hear the full interview below:

 

In terms of Mt Burr Swamp, we’ve now restored wetland levels by 55cm (from its artificially drained level), providing a fantastic opportunity for one of our threatened freshwater fish species, the Little Galaxias, to recolonise and thrive in the main swamp.

Little Galaxias (Photo by Michael Hammer)

Little Galaxias (Photo by Michael Hammer)

Although we’ve not yet detected the galaxias there, the swamp is now known to host a population of the Growling Grass Frog.

Come along to the celebration day to see what critters are living in the recently restored swamp, and maybe even discover whether the little galaxias have returned… our native freshwater fish experts Nick Whiterod and Lauren Veale will be available to answer all your questions!

Levels in the swamp have been increased by 55 cm as a result of this temporary structure on the outlet drain.

Levels in the swamp have been increased by 55 cm as a result of this temporary structure on the outlet drain. Photo taken on the 4th of October 2016, by Lachlan Farrington.



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