Students brave the elements to increase Red-tailed Black Cockatoo habitat

Students brave the elements to increase Red-tailed Black Cockatoo habitat

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Students discussing their find

On the first day back of Term 3, 25 July, students from Glenburnie Primary School joined NGT staff at a bush block in the Wattle Range region to plant Stringybark seedlings for the endangered Red-tailed Black Cockatoo. The significant area of remnant bushland exists on land managed for Tasmanian Blue-gum production, reminding us that primary production and conservation can be effective partners.

Just over 20 students from Years 6 and 7, along with Principal Sam Griffith and other teaching staff, helped with the planting of 400 seedlings which were grown by the school. The growing of these seedlings was supported through the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Recovery team. Brown Stringybark (Eucalyptus baxteri) is one of just three species which this highly specialised feeder relies upon for food.

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Striped Worm Lizard (Aprasia striolata)

The students did an excellent job with the planting, braving the cold and wet conditions. Outdoor learning can present interesting and unusual experiences for young people, with one group excitedly finding a Striped Worm Lizard (legless lizard) in a hole dug for a tree, and another spending time investigating and using critical thinking to identify a skull they found. It was wonderful to see such inquisitive minds in action.

Thanks for your efforts Glenburnie Primary School!

 

 

Rose Thompson
Rose Thompson


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