Dragonflies and Damselflies (Part 3)

If you have managed to get out and poke around a few wetlands lately you would have seen a large number and possibly a variety of species of Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies). It hasn’t been unusual to find up to 8-9 species at any given site depending on how large the site is and how much time you have to explore it.

Below are a few additional species to show case for you from the South East of SA and/or south-western Victoria.

Cup Ringtail (Austrolestes psyche)

Cup Ringtail (Austrolestes psyche)

This particular individual was roosting in a grassy woodland, some distance from water in Annya State Forest.

Swamp Tiger-tail (Synthemis eustalacta)

Swamp Tiger-tail (Synthemis eustalacta)

The Swamp Tiger-tail is one I’ve come across as far west as Lake Frome (Southend), but also over towards Condah (Vic). This individual (is a female), was at a dam and perched on wetland vegetation surrounded by pine plantation.

Australian Emerald (Hemicordulia australiae)

Australian Emerald (Hemicordulia australiae)

The Australian Emerald is almost identical to the Tau Emerald (Part 1) but once in the hand or if you are lucky enough to capture one on camera while perched, the eyes are emerald green and the marks on the wings are black (not orange/brown).

Common Glider (Tramea loweii)

Common Glider (Tramea loweii)

The Common Glider is hardly common in our neck of the woods and I haven’t actually seen any this season. Notable is the red colouration on the hind wings which can be seen in flight. Has anyone seen this one lately?

Swamp Flat-tail (Austrothemis nigricens)

Swamp Flat-tail (Austrothemis nigricens)

This medium sized dragonfly commonly perches down low of vegetation and flattens out its abdomen as can be seen in this photo. Reported from Lake Edward, Lucindale, and Robe drains (SA).

Yellow-striped Hunter (Austrogomphus guerini)

Yellow-striped Hunter (Austrogomphus guerini)

The rivers and creeks of south-west Victoria offer a plethora of Odonates. This medium sized dragonfly is actually a female (males are very similar) but was happy to land on my canoe for an easy photograph. The Glenelg River at Dartmoor was the location.

I do hope to encounter a few more species before the season finishes – Happy Odonating!

Bryan Haywood
Bryan Haywood
bryan.haywood@natureglenelg.org.au