29 Oct 2017 Success by OneFortyOne in protecting Wedge-tailed Eagle nests

Ecologists at Nature Glenelg Trust have been monitoring known Wedge-tailed eagle nests within the pine forests of OneFortyOne Plantations over the last few months. This is the second season of monitoring and we covered 12 known nests sites this year, which were checked three times over a period of 6 weeks from July to September.

While OneFortyOne has committed to protect eagle nests within their plantations, the regular monitoring should eventually give us an insight into the birds behaviour when it comes to reusing old nests after pines around a nest tree have been harvested.

So far this year’s surveys have provided us with some exciting news. Two of the 12 nests are being used. One by a breeding pair of Peregrine falcons (see pictured). Peregrine falcons are listed as a rare species in South Australia and it is exciting to see them breed in the area. This nest is situated in a coupe which will be clear felled in a few years.

Peregrine falcon on nest. Photo taken by Nicole Mojonnier from a safe distance early on in the monitoring period.

Peregrine falcon on nest. Photo taken by Nicole Mojonnier from a safe distance early on in the monitoring period.

The other active nest was active in 2016 when the clearfall age plantation was still standing, and OneFortyOne delayed their harvest to minimise disturbance to the pair. The plantation was then clearfelled and the nest tree was left standing with a few protective pine trees around it to provide additional shade and shelter from the elements. We are pleased to report that, Wedge-tailed Eagles have been observed on or near the nest over the last few months and an adult is still sitting as shown. So we await like expecting parents to see a fluffy white chick in the coming weeks.

Photo taken from a safe distance. to not disturb the bird. Arrow showing head of adult can be seen amongst branches.

Photo taken from a safe distance. to not disturb the bird. Arrow showing head of adult amongst branches.

Thanks to NGT’s Nicole Mojonnier for her efforts in monitoring the nests this season, and for OneFortyOne’s¬†efforts to protect the nests of these iconic birds.

Bryan Haywood
Bryan Haywood
bryan.haywood@natureglenelg.org.au